2016 Top 5 Posts, #1 – “Mom, do you love meeee?”

I am happy that the following came in at Number 1 in 2016; it is one of my favorites.

We still have the same conversations and he still says it exactly same way. I will surely never correct him and I hope that no one else will either…..

“Mom, do you love meeee?”

I love you Magly

From the time that I was old enough to think about it, I always promised myself that if I were ever to have children that there would never be a second in their lives that they would not know that they are loved. This would never be something that they would have to wonder about – not for a single moment…

I think I have lived up to that promise to myself.

DC can and does tell me that he loves me many times a day – complete with and accompanied by the “I love you sign”. I know that he understands in his own way, what that means. This is not to say that I believe it is always all about me. Much of the time it is, but there are times when he just needs to have something to say. It is kind of a comfort thing for him. He says it over and over again when he is in an uncomfortable situation or a place that is new to him.

But, back to me….

I especially love it when he, at 25 reverts back to “I love you Mommy” instead of Mom, Mother or Vickie.  He is probably one of the most lovable people around and I am willing to take complete credit for that.

Is it just learned behavior and not real emotion?

Is it comparable to the times that I have to make a rule because I know he does not understand something?

Is he just, in his mind, following another rule?

Is he just going through the motions because that is what he thinks he should be doing or how he should be acting?

I used to wonder about that when he was younger but now I am convinced that although I am sure that some of that lovability was originally something that he learned, it IS also very full of emotion.

All of the above does not mean that he does not hear his fair share of yelling because let’s face it, every behavior can not be blamed on his autism.

When these situations arise and he is “in trouble” and after I start finding his apology notes everywhere – we always sit down and have a talk.

“No matter how upset Mom might get when you do something you are not supposed to… I always love you. When you are in trouble, I always love you. You never ever have to worry about that.”

When he is “in trouble” and we have not had the talk in what he thinks is a timely manner, he will come to me and say “Always ‘loves’ you.” He knows it, but he needs to have the talk. It’s a ritual and it is comforting to him.

DC’s ongoing “I Love you” campaign has evolved recently. While all of the above still holds true, he has added, ” Mom, do you love me?” (in his high pitched squeaky voice with the emphasis on the “me”).  I know he is not questioning the fact. I know he knows this and I know that he just wants to hear it again. I also know that this line must be something he picked up from a book or a movie because he is using the correct pronouns.

Just to change it up a bit, my response to this question is: “I love you madly”.

Just to change it up a bit more, I will ask: “DC, do you love me?”

His response is another in the long list of words/phrases that he uses that I know I should correct speech-wise, but I do not because I love the way he says them. I hope that this response never changes.

Mom, I love you ‘Magly’.

No corrections necessary……….

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2016 Top 5 Posts, #2 1/2 – But does he know……

The following post was not written in 2016. It was written two years ago. I am including it as part of my “Top 5 Week” because it actually received more views this year than it did when it was originally posted. I also have a post banging around in my head that runs along this line, so I decided to give it it’s rightful place in the line up.

Two years later; I still really do not know…..

But does he know……

Lost in thought NY

I’ve been asked quite a few times –  twice just this past week, if I have ever told DC that he has autism and if so how did I approach the subject. Most of the questions came from mothers with children that are just beginning to or do already realize that they are different from their classmates and friends.

To be perfectly honest, I really do not think that DC is aware that he is different – I do not know if this is a good thing – at the moment I am going with – yes, but I really do not think he sees any differences between himself and other ‘men’ his age, or anyone for that matter. I really do not believe age is a factor in anything he thinks about or notices. I don’t think age means anything to him at all.

That being said, it is never perfectly clear just what he might understand and what he does not. I really do not know what goes on in his head at times. I Know that just because he doesn’t seem to notice or understand, does not always mean that he doesn’t. Going on the small chance that he may actually know that he is different… yes, I have told him. I have told him many times, since he was very young.

We don’t have “sit down and talk about it” sessions because he becomes overwhelmed with too much information. He needs examples, he needs to see something. We also can not  talk about it too often – when we talk about anything too often, it makes him anxious – he thinks something is wrong.  I never want to give him the impression that anything is ‘wrong’ with him. He doesn’t need that.

I have to take the opportunities when they come. Because he is very visual, I try to approach the subject when we are watching TV or reading something that happens to have a character with Autism. The first time I brought it up to him, we were watching TV.

I remember starting out by pointing out the character.

“DC, do you see that boy?”

“yes”

“He has autism. Do you know that you have autism too”

“yes” (he answers “yes” to just about everything)

“Do you see the way he flaps his arms? Who else does that?”

“You” (pronoun confusion – ‘you’ instead of ‘me’)

“Autism means you and the boy may think about things a little bit differently than Mom and some of your friends. Can you say ‘Autism’?”

“Autism” (usually I can type his pronunciations, but I can not type his pronunciation of the word Autism)

We’ve gone through this scenario many times – arms flapping – loud noises – whatever happens to be going on with a character or story.

We talk about it when we participate in an Autism Walk or fundraiser. We talk about which of his friends have autism. I can not get into too much into detail with him, I just point things out as they come up – a character, a fundraiser, his friends….

I point it out to him when he is watching his sign language sing-a-long DVD’s. I explain to him that his autism made it harder for him to speak at first (he was non-verbal until he was 7), this is why he went to speech therapy with Liza for so many years.

He was always very happy to see Liza every week. He worked hard.

(He LOVES Liza)

Before he learned to speak, he used sign-language.

He was always happy to see Sandi for sign. He worked hard with her as well.

(He LOVES Sandi)

Speech therapy and sign language were “good” things in his mind – fun time. This can be directly attributed to the insight and resourcefulness of both Liza and Sandi and the way they choose to make the process fun by working from his interests and incorporating them into his sessions. I am 100% sure that Liza can recite the “Wizard of Oz”, in every variation to this day. They made him happy.

We’ve discussed* it many, many times over the years and in many different ways, but for a boy who remembers everything, he can not give me the word “Autism” at any other time.  Unless I ask him to repeat it for me, he does not seem to even remember ever hearing the word. This just strengthens my belief that he really does not understand any of it. He does not know that he’s different and for now, that is fine with me. My goal here is not to make him feel that he is different.

So why do I continue to talk about it?

On the chance that he does recognize this now or later on, I don’t want him to wonder and not be able to communicate the question to me. This isn’t the sort of question he would ever be able to communicate.

And though I am relatively sure he does not understand, it is possible one day he may understand, or partially understand, but over and above all of that, if he were to hear “Autism” or “Autistic” elsewhere I want to be sure he doesn’t think it something that is “bad” or “wrong with him”.

I don’t and will not harp on it – I don’t feel the need to have those long heart – to – heart flowery discussions about it. He is happy, he knows he is loved. I will continue to mention it from time to time when the occasion arises, just so the word is recognizable to him and just in case he should ever wonder. If there comes a time when it seems that he might need to know more then I will try to explain it a little more in-depth or try to come up with a different way to explain it to him. For now, he seems to be just fine knowing what he knows and that is really all I want.

I wish I had a better answer for the people who asked…

Have I told him?  – Yes.

But does he ‘know’?

I may never know for sure….

Branches, Branches, everywhere..

DC fell asleep on the couch last night. I happened to notice a scrape on his elbow. I went over to check to see if it was actually a scrape and accidentally woke him from a dead sleep. I apologized and told him that I was just looking at the scrape he had on his arm. In his half-asleep/half-awake fog, he felt for it. I asked him what had happened –

and even in this not fully awake –  really mostly asleep state; his answer was the same as it always is. Already drifting back to sleep,  he  whispered,  “Tree Branch”.

From earlier this year:

Those pesky tree branches…

tree branch

I know that I have written more than once about DC’s inability to communicate to me or anyone else if/when something might be  wrong. There have been very few times that he has actually volunteered information to me when he was not feeling well or when something hurt or was bothering him.

Most of the times when he does communicate a problem to me, it is really just a ploy to cover himself in Band-Aids:

DC: “Mom, my leg is killing me.” (there was nothing wrong with his leg, I checked)

Me: “What happened to your leg?”

DC:”I broke my leg.”

Me: “How did you break your leg?”

DC: “Tree branch. Ouch!” (we are in the house)…

The lengths that he will go, to plaster himself in Band-Aids.

A tree branch seems to be the number one culprit in many of his injuries. This leads me to believe that at one time or another a tree branch was indeed the reason for an injury. When? I have no idea, but once he comes up with an answer he likes, it usually becomes one of his standard answers.

More often than not the answer I get is Nothing ‘wong’ or Nothing happened. Although DC almost never really gets cuts or scrapes – which I assume is the reason for his obsession with Band-Aids and really is not what I’d call accident prone, he does always seem to have an odd mark or “spot” somewhere or another. These “spot” mysteries oftentimes take a good amount of time for me to figure out. He is not always a big help in that area.

There was the one time that he came home from his senior class picnic with a red mark (scrape, but not really band-aide worthy) on his arm. When I asked him what happened, he told me that his IA (Para, to some of you) Mrs. G. pushed him into a bush and he fell down. Now, if I were a more paranoid person (hahaha, who am I kidding, we all know I am) I would have believed this because He Was Actually Telling Me Something, but I have known Mrs. G for years so his explanation did not hold water. Of course I did not tell him that I didn’t believe his story because: 1. He actually told me something and I didn’t want to discourage him from doing so in the future and 2. I assumed that he probably really did fall into a bush and Mrs. G was there to help him out. ~ It’s all in the translation. I spoke with Mrs. G the next day and yes, my version was correct.

Or the time that I noticed a large quarter sized mark on the side of his leg/hip one morning before camp. I could not for the life of me figure out what happened. He was offering no information at all. I asked the camp nurse to take a look at it. She did not think it was any kind of bug bite (I am always concerned about bug/tick bites when he is at camp). I asked DC again what happened he just kept saying “swing”

“Did you fall off of the swing?”

No, swing.

“Did you get stuck on something on the swing?”

No! Swing (he was beginning to get upset – so I had to stop because if I ask too many questions he thinks he is getting it wrong and changes his story).

After thinking about it for quite some time, I realized that he was actually telling me what happened. It was the swing. DC loves the swings at camp. He will spend any free time and all of the outdoor rec. portion of his time on the swings. He is a big boy. The swing was rubbing against his hip every day, causing something that resembled a very large healed-over blister. Once I figured it out, we just kept it covered with Band-Aids, so as not to cause so much friction. This was one of the very few times where Band-Aids were applied for a legitimate reason .

Then there was the big stripe down the side of his neck, which is a regular occurrence now, but the first time I noticed this mark, it scared the life out of me.

“Oh My God! What happened?”

“Tree branch”

He was in the car with me all day. He did not come in contact with a tree branch. Once again, it took me a while to figure this one out. When we are driving he rocks back and forth in his seat with so much force that it shakes the whole car (very distracting to the person driving). Because we had been driving so long, the seat belt was rubbing against his neck with every rock for a good long time, causing this large red stripe down the side of his neck. I do not think he even felt it. I have always believed that he does not feel pain the way we do or he does not process pain the way we do.  This and the fact that he is not always able to communicate what might be going on is and will always be a huge worry of mine. Verbal does not always mean communication.

Last week, I noticed a mark on the back of his leg. I asked him what happened. “Nothing happened”

He hates for me to look at these things because he is afraid that he will have to go to the doctor. After a lot of back and forth and ‘egg – guo – ing’ he let me put some anti-bacterial cream on it and he went on his way. He brought it up again the following day on his own as his way of apologizing for giving me a hard time the day before. “Feels much better now, Mom! Thank you! Thank you!”.

I asked him again what happened and he rattled off a list. I am sure the answer may be in there somewhere if I think about it long enough – and then again, maybe not… one never knows.

“The swing” (which would have made perfect sense as it looked similar to the swing injury –  if he had been on a swing.)

“A rock”

“A spindle – ouch” (my personal favorite)

‘The chair”

“Tree Branch”

So…..

Sometimes I do get the answer I am looking for albeit in a round-about way,

and other times…..

I am just left with a tree branch..

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Mom, do you love meeee?”

I love you Magly

From the time that I was old enough to think about it, I always promised myself that if I were ever to have children that there would never be a second in their lives that they would not know that they are loved. This would never be something that they would have to wonder about – not for a single moment…

I think I have lived up to that promise to myself.

DC can and does tell me that he loves me many times a day – complete with and accompanied by the “I love you sign”. I know that he understands in his own way, what that means. This is not to say that I believe it is always all about me. Much of the time it is but there are times when he just needs to have something to say. It’s kind of a comfort thing for him. He says it over and over again when he is in an uncomfortable situation or a place that is new to him.

But, back to me….

I especially love it when he, at 25 reverts back to “I love you Mommy” instead of Mom, Mother or Vickie.  He is probably one of the most lovable people around and I am willing to take complete credit for that.

Is it just learned behavior and not real emotion?

Is it comparable to the times that I have to make a rule because I know he does not understand something?

Is he just, in his mind, following another rule?

Is he just going through the motions because that is what he thinks he should be doing or how he should be acting?

I used to wonder about that when he was younger but now I am convinced that although I am sure that some of that lovability was originally something that he learned, it IS also very full of emotion.

All of the above does not mean that he does not hear his fair share of yelling because let’s face it, every behavior can not be blamed on his autism.

When these situations arise and he is “in trouble” and after I start finding his apology notes everywhere – we always sit down and have a talk.

“No matter how upset Mom might get when you do something you are not supposed to… I always love you. When you are in trouble, I always love you. You never ever have to worry about that.”

When he is “in trouble” and we have not had the talk in what he thinks is a timely manner, he will come to me and say “Always ‘loves’ you.” He knows it, but he needs to have the talk. It’s a ritual and it is comforting to him.

DC’s ongoing “I Love you” campaign has evolved recently. While all of the above still holds true, he has added, ” Mom, do you love me?” (in his high pitched squeaky voice with the emphasis on the “me”).  I know he is not questioning the fact. I know he knows this and I know that he just wants to hear it again. I also know that this line must be something he picked up from a book or a movie because he is using the correct pronouns.

Just to change it up a bit, my response to this question is: “I love you madly”.

Just to change it up a bit more, I will ask: “DC, do you love me?”

His response is another in the long list of words/phrases that he uses that I know I should correct speech-wise, but I do not because I love the way he says them. I hope that this response never changes.

Mom, I love you ‘Magly’.

No corrections necessary……….

Those pesky tree branches…

tree branch

I know that I have written more than once about DC’s inability to communicate to me or anyone else if/when something might be  wrong. There have been very few times that he has actually volunteered information to me when he was not feeling well or when something hurt or was bothering him.

Most of the times when he does communicate a problem to me, it is really just a ploy to cover himself in Band-Aids:

DC: “Mom, my leg is killing me.” (there was nothing wrong with his leg, I checked)

Me: “What happened to your leg?”

DC:”I broke my leg.”

Me: “How did you break your leg?”

DC: “Tree branch. Ouch!” (we are in the house)…

The lengths that he will go, to plaster himself in Band-Aids.

A tree branch seems to be the number one culprit in many of his injuries. This leads me to believe that at one time or another a tree branch was indeed the reason for an injury. When? I have no idea, but once he comes up with an answer he likes, it usually becomes one of his standard answers.

More often than not the answer I get is Nothing ‘wong’ or Nothing happened. Although DC never really gets cuts or scrapes – which I assume is the reason for his obsession with Band-Aids and really is not what I’d call accident prone, he does always seem to have an odd mark or “spot” somewhere or another. These “spot” mysteries oftentimes take a good amount of time for me to figure out. He is not always a big help in that area.

There was the one time that he came home from his senior class picnic with a red mark (scrape, but not really band-aide worthy) on his arm. When I asked him what happened, he told me that his IA (Para, to some of you) Mrs. G. pushed him into a bush and he fell down. Now, if I were a more paranoid person (hahaha, who am I kidding, we all know I am) I would have believed this because He Was Actually Telling Me Something, but I have known Mrs. G for years so his explanation did not hold water. Of course I did not tell him that I didn’t believe his story because: 1. He actually told me something and I didn’t want to discourage him from doing so in the future and 2. I assumed that he probably really did fall into a bush and Mrs. G was there to help him out. ~ It’s all in the translation. I spoke with Mrs. G the next day and yes, my version was correct.

Or the time that I noticed a large quarter sized mark on the side of his leg/hip one morning before camp. I could not for the life of me figure out what happened. He was offering no information at all. I asked the camp nurse to take a look at it. She did not think it was any kind of bug bite (I am always concerned about bug/tick bites when he is at camp). I asked DC again what happened he just kept saying “swing”

“Did you fall off of the swing?”

No, swing.

“Did you get stuck on something on the swing?”

No! Swing (he was beginning to get upset – so I had to stop because if I ask too many questions he thinks he is getting it wrong and changes his story).

After thinking about it for quite some time, I realized that he was actually telling me what happened. It was the swing. DC loves the swings at camp. He will spend any free time and all of the outdoor rec. portion of his time on the swings. He is a big boy. The swing was rubbing against his hip every day, causing something that resembled a very large healed-over blister. Once I figured it out, we just kept it covered with Band-Aids, so as not to cause so much friction. This was one of the very few times where Band-Aids were applied for a legitimate reason .

Then there was the big stripe down the side of his neck, which is a regular occurrence now, but the first time I noticed this mark, it scared the life out of me.

“Oh My God! What happened?”

“Tree branch”

He was in the car with me all day. He did not come in contact with a tree branch. Once again, it took me a while to figure this one out. When we are driving he rocks back and forth in his seat with so much force that it shakes the whole car (very distracting to the person driving). Because we had been driving so long, the seat belt was rubbing against his neck with every rock for a good long time, causing this large red stripe down the side of his neck. I do not think he even felt it. I have always believed that he does not feel pain the way we do or he does not process pain the way we do.  This and the fact that he is not always able to communicate what might be going on is and will always be a huge worry of mine. Verbal does not always mean communication.

Last week, I noticed a mark on the back of his leg. I asked him what happened. “Nothing happened”

He hates for me to look at these things because he is afraid that he will have to go to the doctor. After a lot of back and forth and ‘egg – guo – ing’ he let me put some anti-bacterial cream on it and he went on his way. He brought it up again the following day on his own as his way of apologizing for giving me a hard time the day before. “Feels much better now, Mom! Thank you! Thank you!”.

I asked him again what happened and he rattled off a list. I am sure the answer may be in there somewhere if I think about it long enough – and then again, maybe not… one never knows.

“The swing” (which would have made perfect sense as it looked similar to the swing injury –  if he had been on a swing.)

“A rock”

“A spindle – ouch” (my personal favorite)

‘The chair”

“Tree Branch”

So…..

Sometimes I do get the answer I am looking for albeit in a round-about way,

and other times…..

I am just left with a tree branch..

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Walk Slowly

cruise 081 (2)

We’ve had some “weather” over the past week or so. Ice and snow are not on the list of DC’s favorite things. Usually I have to walk him out to his transportation if there is even a patch of snow or ice on the sidewalk – and believe me, he does not have a problem taking me down with him (or instead of him) if he falls or even just slips a little bit.  It is drama all of the way. Watching him walk down the sidewalk the other day (it was clear enough to “do it all by myself”), reminded me of the following post from right around this time two years ago.

So, from January 2014, we have…..

Literally Speaking

Raining Cats and Dogs

Raining Cats and Dogs

Twelve years ago, I wrote this:

“You can NEVER be too specific:

 While learning “grocery shopping” in the classroom; his plastic cart full of plastic food… he was told that it was time to “put everything on the counter to pay” – Instead of taking the food out of the cart, he lifted the entire cart onto the counter!”

And

“When you tell your child to pull his sweat pants down over his socks and he proceeds to PULL HIS PANTS DOWN from the waist to his ankles – You know you were not specific enough with your request.”

And a few years later, this:

My son loves to write little “stories” (he thinks they are stories, but they are usually just one line).

I had been home from work for a few days with the “Flu”.  It really didn’t occur to me that he had no idea what the “Flu” was and I wondered why he would laugh each time I mentioned it. He decided he would write one of his one-line “stories” for me to make me feel better ……

“Mom was so high”

It took me a few minutes…… but then I realized he thought I “Flew”

  • Then there was the time I said “Now listen closely” and he stuck his face one inch from mine…..
  •  He laughed for about a week after I told him it was time to “hit the road”.
  •  Or.. after the third round of kids whacked the piñata at his camp Halloween party, the Director said “Okay, DC, lets’ see you to tear it up” – he yanked it down and ripped it apart with his hands.

tear it up

There are so many other examples, but these few really stick in my head.

Needless to say, like many people with autism, DC takes everything literally.  Over the years, I have gotten much better at recognizing when something is said or read that taken literally will not make much sense to him. I always try to stop and explain what it means in that context, whether he asks or not.

He has made a great deal of progress in that area as well. He knows that the “flu” does not mean “flying”. He gets that “hit the road” means we have to get going. But he knows these things because they were explained to him, he is not able just figure it out himself – how could he?

Knowing this about my son, I suppose, when I told him to “walk slowly” on the sidewalk just in case there was ice (there wasn’t), I should have expected this:

Journals

journalBelow is an article that was published in the October issue of APM. I did share the entire issue when it was first published, but was asked not to share the article itself on my blog (something to do with Google and Searches) until it appeared on their blog. Since it has not appeared on their blog so far and I still am trying to blog from my phone due to our internet issues, I thought that inserting photos rather than trying to type with one finger on my phone seems to be the easiest route to publishing a new post. I decided I would share it under a different title as not to go back on my word and confuse Google.

 

APM Pg 39

Pg 40

This story was originally posted here with the title of “What Did You Do Today?”

It was published in the October Issue of Autism Parenting Magazine – Take a minute to read the full issue.

Hope to be back on-line very soon!

Keep on Tryin’

try2

Semi-typical morning….

DC: “Mom I need help! Something is wrong!”

I run upstairs – due to his recent-ish development of seizures, I run a little bit faster with a bit more panic than I used to.

Me: “What’s wrong?”

DC (angrily) : “Nothing wrong!”

Me: “Bud, you called me and said something was wrong and you needed help. You have to try to tell me what is wrong.”

DC: “Nothing wrong!”

Me: “If you try to tell me I can help you”

DC: “Nothing wrong!”

At this point he is beginning to clench his jaw and arms to the point where his whole body is shaking. I go through the list of everything that would normally set him off in the morning:

  • Did he find a pin hole in his sock?
  • Did he get a drop of water on his shirt?
  • Does he not like the shirt?
  • Is there a tag I didn’t remove?
  • Did I move something in his room?

“NO! NOTHING WRONG!”

Me: “Okay do you want me to leave?”

DC (getting more angry): “YES!”

I take all of two steps towards my room to get ready for work when I hear “Mom, come here. I need your help!” I turn around and am right in front of the door when he decides to slam it in my face.

Me: “DC, that was very rude. You called me to help you and you slammed the door.”

DC: “I’m sorry, Mom ‘for rude’. I will never be rude again!” and he opens the door.

Me: “Okay, Please try to tell me what is bothering you and I can try to help you.”

DC (still clenching) “NOTHING BOTHERING YOU!”

I went though the list of every aliment I could think of; headache, stomach ache, etc…..

DC: “NO! Nothing wrong!”

This whole back and forth continued for another 15 minutes (one might wonder why I either just make it or am late for work every day). He wanted me there but then he didn’t, so I decided to just sit there with him without asking him any questions at all. After a while he calmed down and was back to his happy, smiling self. Whatever was bothering him was not bothering him anymore. After 24 years of trying to figure out every little thing, I had to chalk this one up to not ever knowing what the problem was. Morning issues seem to end up in the unsolved column more often than ‘other time of the day’ issues.

Ready and waiting for his transportation to arrive he said,  “You are the best Mom I ever was” – something I never tire of hearing; exactly the way he says it.

But then….

“Mom, I try so hard”

Whether this was:

  • one of those random phrases that he tends to throw out that does not mean what he thinks it means but often is shockingly  appropriate to the matter at hand
  • or mixing up his pronouns meaning I was trying hard to figure out what was bothering him
  • or he knew exactly what he was saying and was saying exactly what he meant…..

I opted for number 3. The fact of the matter is that he does always try very hard. As much as I have the need to figure it all out all of the time there will always be days when I can’t. As much as he would probably like to be able to tell me, there will always be those days when he can’t ~ and that’s all right. We will both keep on trying.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In place of the rant scheduled for today; I give you – “I told you so”

i told you so

Yesterday I was off on a pretty good rant. I had read a few things in the last few weeks that made me angry and listened to a few more that added to that anger. Let’s just say that the ‘ranty/venty’ post that I wrote earlier was really not ‘fit or human consumption’. I did save it in hopes that I can make it a little less hostile – hopefully I will, one day.

In lieu of the scheduled post is a post I wrote a few years ago about the trials, tribulations and battle for speech therapy for DC, which just so happens to be a small piece of the scheduled rant…..

I don’t want to give away the ending but there may just be an “I told you so” in the mix.

Sometimes “I told you so” is just good for the soul

DC in Uniform - Challengers Baseball

DC played baseball with the *Challengers League from the time he was 5 until he aged out last year at 21.

The “official” Challengers field in town is located in front of the school he attended for Birth to 3, Early Intervention and Kindergarten. Needless to say he was in this building and with many of the same teachers for a good 4 or 5 years.

I’ve had my battles with the school system over the years, but none so on-going as the need for speech therapy. This battle began in Early Intervention and continued on straight into High School.

Sign Language, I believed was absolutely necessary thanks to my sister in-law, Lisa who convinced me that sign would not prevent him from speaking if he had the capability to eventually speak. It might lessen his frustration level at not being able to communicate (it did). But sign was not, in my mind ‘Speech Therapy” and should not be considered as part of the Speech Therapy hours listed in his IEP.  Speech Therapy in a group setting also should not be counted as his speech therapy. Yes, he did need to learn to be able to focus in a group setting, but focusing in a group setting is not speech therapy, it is learning to focus in a group setting.

I can’t tell you how many of these teachers told me he would never speak. One speech therapist, Barbara, actually told me that I was obsessed with DC speaking and “You know, if he isn’t talking by now, he probably isn’t going to”. He was 4 or 5 at the time.

They went so far as to schedule and pay for an evaluation at a well known Medical Center to have him evaluated for a **“Talking Board”. I went to this evaluation, never intending for him to use a Talking Board, but to use the evaluation as proof he was capable of speech. As it turns out, this is exactly what the Doctor doing the evaluating said; he did not recommend the Talking Board and noted this in his report.

I didn’t give up on my battle with the school system, but I also didn’t want to waste any more time getting him the speech therapy he needed, I went out and got other speech evaluations and hired a private speech therapist.  Liza was wonderful and made a great deal of progress with him. She was with him for many years.  Armed with the evaluations and his progress, I was finally able to prove this to school system – Quite the Catch 22, he had to speak before they would agree to one on one speech therapy! Unfortunately it took a few years to get to this point with them; years that would have been wasted if he were not receiving the private speech therapy.

But back to baseball…….

Our league used a PA system and we always had a volunteer to announce the games.  Each game was opened with the Pledge of Allegiance.

When I was President of the league, I decided that every player should have a chance to be in the spotlight. Each week two players were assigned as team captains and another player was assigned to do whatever they were capable of doing on the microphone.

Some led the pledge; some sang a patriotic song or just yelled “Play Ball!”  If they were not verbal, they stood at attention at the Flag or threw out the first pitch.

Our games were played on Saturday mornings and Wednesday evenings. DC was about 10 years old and on this particular Wednesday when he was scheduled to be in the spotlight. Coincidently all of the teachers from the Early Intervention Program had been attending a meeting at the school after hours and decided to come down to watch the game before heading home. Most of the players had been their students at one time or another.

Many of them had not seen DC in about 4 years.  Just imagine the feeling I had to see DC to go to the mic and sing “America the Beautiful” as clear as a bell with all of those “professionals” who years earlier told me he would never speak, sitting right there in the stands! I could not have PLANNED this if I tried!

Sometimes an “I told you so” is just good for the soul, even if you don’t have to

actually say it out loud.

 

A VERSION OF THIS POST WAS PUBLISHED ON THE MIGHTY – “They Told Me He’d Never Speak. Then They Heard Him Sing”

Short Stories

It has been another one of “those” weeks. A “fluff” piece usually goes hand-in-hand with one of “those” weeks (lately, anyway).

Below are some “short stories” (statuses) that have been posted on my own and my public Facebook pages – too short to qualify for a blog post, although many have turned out to be the inspiration for an official blog post. You may have seen a few of these before, probably not all though.

This is one of those posts that I put together and save to post later when we are away or when I am really busy and really don’t have the time to write .Like the “Blog Title Series” (Series? Yes, there’s more), they are very often off topic or “fluff”. I like fluff, sometimes fluff is fun.  (a few current status’ have been added to the “saved” version before publishing)”

 

Well, DC got on the bus this morning wearing a 4 inch witch nose – he’s in the spirit!

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Today the bus driver will be entertained by a flashing Rudolf nose.

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…… and who thought an electronic mega-phone complete with siren was a good idea for Christmas?

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Banana phone

I was required to have a conversation on the “banana phone” with the Fairy Godmother before he would eat the banana –

 

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merry happy

 

“Merry Happy Christmas Eve, Mom”

 

 

 

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Lesson of the week: Using the phrase “let’s head out” when taking DC to the bookstore, means that “let’s head out” ALWAYS means he’s going to the bookstore #ThingsIShouldKnowByNow

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Well he’s heard the “T & L “ words on the weather . It is official. There will be NO outdoor activities for us today

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Camera roll 10-2013 082“Mom, the glasses are bothering you”. (Translation: I bought new cheaters, they are different, he can’t stand it. They are bothering HIM.) But…. he’s not trying to take them off my face as he used to. #Progress

 

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DC is shaving – getting ready for the Prom, scaring the life out of me w/ the razor. Finally he turns to me & says “Mom, are you still here?” #IGuessThatsMyCue

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942836_4933935990806_2128176601_n

Doug after sitting through 23 coffee-house acts at DC’s Arc activity. I guess we’ll be skipping this activity the next time around.

 


 

 

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“Mom, how are you feeling?”
(Me) “I am fine, how are you feeling?”
“I am perfectly ‘nis-able’ ” ~ Even Stevens – Influenza the Musical

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DC just informed me that he needs to get his “beauty rest”

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Going to have lunch today with DC at his “job”. He’s excited because he knows he will be able to have a cheeseburger……. Should I be upset that I don’t rate as highly as a cheeseburger?

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Camera roll 10-2013 117So after I wiped out on my walk with DC today, I asked him “what would you do if mom couldn’t get up?” He answered w/out hesitation “call 911” (after he stopped laughing, of course) #Progress

 

 

 

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ren faire

We went to the Ren Faire to see my brother’s show. DC loved it but yelled out in mid-performance “Oh no! *Bill, are you okay?” He was very concerned about the welfare of *Bill and *Uncle ‘Scamp’ and the bed of nails. Although not as concerned about the man actually laying ON the bed of nails…..

 

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DC picked up the word “sympathy” from one of his books last night & figured out it means “sorry”. So now he’s “in sympathy” for sneaking chips yesterday

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DC: “Annette ‘Fun – Tree – O’ in Babes In Toyland, my favorite movie” (Me: Worst Movie Ever …. Seriously ….)

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We had our  IP (The “E” is dropped post-school age) meeting this morning at DC’s program. The first with his new case worker. One of the first sentences out of my normally agreeable son was “I don’t like this stupid meeting!”
1. I’m the Mother so I can not laugh (but I think I may have anyway)
2. I couldn’t agree with him more……

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It’s a New Years Eve, Eve miracle! DC is eating PASTA!
PASTA! And about 10 meatballs, but…..PASTA!

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grease

Just because I LOVE this and……. our kids ROCK!

 

 

 

 

 

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headyache

 

I couldn’t have said it better! #DC-isms

 

 

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I was on the phone with an automated system that was not cooperating. DC was making a lot of noise behind me. I told him that he had to be quieter while I was on the phone. I suppose he did not trust himself to keep the noise down because when I turned around, he had applied a Band-Aid over his mouth! Band-Aid 101 – other uses.

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soundmachine

Band-aide 101 – other uses”  When I told him that his sound machine was too loud; this was the fix he came up with.

Happy Sunday!

 

 

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arm

 But then, of course there are the “regular” uses #HeJustLikesBandAids

 

 

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DC: “Mom, my leg is killing me.” (there was nothing wrong with his leg, I checked)

Me: “What happened to your leg?”

DC:”I broke my leg.”

Me: “How did you break your leg?”

DC: “Tree branch. Ouch!” (we are in the house)…

The lengths that he will go, to plaster himself in band-aids.

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DC doing his best impersonation of Nick from Top Chef 11 – ‘Don’t Touch my pots!”

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DC's hat

DC insisted on putting his Dr. Who WINTER hat into his backpack this morning. I asked him why, he wouldn’t or couldn’t tell me. I pointed out that he has a baseball cap in his backpack for the sun. It didn’t matter. So here’s hoping he won’t be walking around the greenhouse on this beautiful, sunny spring day in a T-shirt and a winter hat. #PickYourBattles #WhoviansUnite

 

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excuse me

DC and his Winter Guard Team went to perform at an Ice Cream Social Fundraiser tonight. In the warm-up room before the show, he and his team were lined up getting their last-minute directions from their Director. DC waving/raising his hand during her speech….. “Excuse me! I’m waiting for Ice Cream”.

 

 

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sick of butter

 

DC presented me with his shopping list for tomorrow. “bandes” – band-aids – and no, he is not sick of butter – he wants butter but in stick form (he doesn’t like the tubs😃)

 

 

 

 

 

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DC woke up in a fabulous mood this morning. “Good Morning Starshine. The earth says hello “ (lol, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory or Hair – take your pick) #DisneylandParis

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DC and Doug decided to go on “Indiana Jones Temple of Peril” in the rain…. Go figure #DisneylandParis meets #MrNoStormToday . Apparently rain is not as frightening at Disneyland

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cape

  A cape…. Because proper attire is a necessity while watching you-tube (and you never know when you may  have to save the world)

 

 

 

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Me: Hi, DC. Is Mrs. H there yet? (I knew she wasn’t, but would be there in seconds – but still I like to try to get the correct replies)

DC: No.

Me: Did you lock the door?

DC: Yes

Me: Did you lock the door?

DC: No.

Me: Please go and lock the door. You are supposed to lock the door as soon as you come home.

DC: Okay

Me: Don’t hang up! (He does not understand that he can just put the phone down, lock the door and come back)

He hangs up…

and second later the phone rings

DC: Hi Mom, I am home again!

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five teen six

 

Book Editing 101 –

Page “Five teen six”

 

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trouble

“Someone” may have just realized that he might be in a little bit of trouble tonight….

 

 

 

 

 

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steve DC was having an “issue” tonight at the time his Best Buddy, Steve called to say hello.

 Steve understands, but I did tell DC that he was very rude to Steve.

 DC went straight into “note-writing” mode and presented me with this note. We did   text  it right over to Steve.

 

 

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rain

It’s pouring.. POURING! DC was ready at the door wearing his raincoat (Me? No. I wasn’t going outside yet). When the car arrived, he ran out and I stood in the door as always. I saw him flagging we to the car, which he never does. Thinking something was wrong and not wanting to waste time looking for my umbrella, I ran to the car as I was. Opening the door, DC said “Mom! It’s raining! Sorry!” (of course he let me stand there in the pouring rain for a little while before he came out with that) … Happy Tuesday!

 

*Some names have been changed to protect the innocent

Have a great weekend…..