The “Fitting Room”

 

Watching the third episode of the new Netflix show “Atypical” I was taken aback first by the mother not wanting to take her son to the mall because he had an issue there the last time they went and secondly, once there, actually pointing out all of the noises that I imagine would have normally bothered him but were clearly not bothering him (as he was on a mission) at the time. It was as if she was disappointed that he was not having an issue with any of it.

There are plenty of things that I do like about this show. The mother is not one of them.

DC is not anywhere close to as independent as Sam is so I can not relate to all of it, but I do think that the literal thinking Sam displays and the way a word might get stuck in his head so much so that he has to repeat it over and over are spot on in relation to DC.

As much as I do not like or agree with the mother’s actions, it did give me pause. Am I so overly sensitive about DC and his surroundings that I may possibly be causing a problem just because I think there is going to be a problem? Am I so sure about how he will react in a situation that I am actually causing him to act that way? I do not think that I do. We go many places and put him into many situations and I think that most of the time, we go thinking (hoping) there will NOT be a problem. But who knows? It is certainly something to think about and keep in the back of my mind.

I WAS a bit surprised by his mother calling ahead to a clothing store to let them know that her son needed a quiet environment, no loud music, no crowds and low lights in order to try on clothes in the fitting room.

I was surprised because it would never occur to me to do that. Parents in a different situation than DC and I, may do that and I am not saying that it is right or wrong – it just would not have occurred to me at all.

I have said quite a few times in earlier posts that I do not necessarily look for accommodations for DC. I want him to try first. This does not mean that if the trying does not work out, or I can see that practice is not going to make it easier, I will not look for a better way or an accommodation – I just do not begin that way. Again, that is just me. That is what I am used to. Accommodations were not available or even thought of when DC was growing up so we either did it the way everyone else had to or we would not be able to do it at all.

I will say that like public restrooms and the complete lack of enough “family” restrooms, fitting rooms are a huge cause of stress for me and DC.

Fortunately most of the time I do not have to have DC try on clothes. There have been times when he had either gained or lost weight and I was not sure what size to purchase that he has had to use the fitting room.

He does not like to “try on” clothes at home to begin with, so trying things on in a store does not make him happy. Then we have to contend with the fitting rooms that are rooms with long hallways of stalls where I can not see him once he goes in. I can not see who might be in there with him either.

The first time I had to send him into a fitting room as described above, he was just going in to high school. I was fortunate that there was a room available right in eye-shot of the main door.

I sent him in with four pair of pants and gave him as many instructions as I could. I wanted him to come out WITH THE PANTS ON so I could see if they fit. The first thing he did was come out in his underwear to hand me the pants he was wearing. I hurried him back in and told him to hang his pants up in the room so he could put them back on when he was finished trying on the rest. He tried the on and came out to show me the rest without incident. Then he came out dressed and carrying all of the pants. It was then that I noticed another flaw in my instructions – he had pulled every single tag off all of the pants.

I have to cut all tags out of his clothes at home so why had it not occurred to me that he would pull all of the price tags and size tags out of the clothes before he put them on? I don’t know, but it did not.

Our next adventure in the fitting room was 3 or 4 years ago when he needed a new suit. Again he was able to use a stall in eye-shot of the door. Remembering the lessons learned from that first time, I gave him his instructions before he went in and continued to remind him by calling all of the instructions into the room as he was changing. The customer shopping around near the fitting room found the whole exchange quite amusing – not in a malicious way though; in a “been there – done that” kind of way. Other than being unhappy about having to try on clothes, DC did much better that time.

By far, one of the hardest fitting room experiences was about a year and a half ago when my step-father passed away. It was not DC who needed something to wear (the suit still fits), it was me. I had gained weight and really just alternated between the 3 or 4 pairs of pants that fit me, quite uncomfortably – for work (I would not buy more because buying a bigger size would be admitting defeat). None of these were dressy enough for a funeral so I had no choice. The wake was that night so I only had that day to find something. I had to take DC with me. Not really knowing my size, I knew I would have to try on a lot of pants and in a few different sizes in order to find one item, just one that would fit and that I did not completely hate.

I found the fitting room and – sigh…. it was room with a long a hallway with many many stalls. I was not sure what to do. There was a bench right outside and I sat DC down and told him not to move. I knew he would not go anywhere, but I did not know what he would do if someone came up and asked him why he was sitting outside the ladies dressing room or if someone asked him to move or if someone asked him anything at all. I told him to call me if anyone talked to him. I went in, yelling to him with each step I took. I did not even make it into one of the stalls when I decided I could not do it.

I came back out and decided that I would just have to buy everything and hope there was something there that fit. If there wasn’t, I was done for because there would not be a lot of time to come back and buy a bunch more just to try on. If there was something that fit, I would just have to return the rest another day.

As we were walking towards the front to pay, we happened upon an alcove with a big round couch in the middle and separate fitting rooms all the way around. Better still, the doors did not go all the way up and I could look over the top! DC sat on the couch and I was able to try on everything while still being able to see him and talk to him from less than 5 feet away.

This kind of set up worked out perfectly and would have been just as helpful if DC were the one doing the “trying on”.

“Family fitting rooms” and more of this type of set up would go a long way in helping to take some of the stress out of shopping and trying on clothes for us and our children………

****

The store with this Fitting Room set up is Kohl’s, I do not know if all of their stores are set up this way but I thought that they deserved a mention. 

 

 

 

 

 

You wear it well….

DC and Jay McCarroll (Season One "Project Runway" winner)

DC and Jay McCarroll (Season One “Project Runway” winner)

I have touched on DC’s clothing issues a bit in earlier posts,  but I’ve never really written about the whole shebang. Last week I was reading a post by Mother O’ Jim (What not to wear: Rules for dress, according to Jim) about just this subject, I found it  funny just how different and the same some of our kid’s clothing issues can be.

I’ve touched on buttons in an earlier post – here:

Buttons: If there is a button there, it needs to be buttoned. Years ago I thought I was being sneaky by removing the top button on all of his shirts so he would not insist on buttoning everything right up to his neck. I discovered I was not as slick as I thought I was one day when DC brought me one of his shirts to have the button removed. He knows there should be a button there and knows I’m cutting it off, but for some reason this is alright with him. Leaving it on and not buttoning it, is not.

Tags and holes as well:

Tags: All tags must be removed from all clothing. If he should find the smallest rip, tear or string, he will proceed to shred that article of clothing. It may take him all day, but he will make sure it can never be worn again. Just recently I mistakenly bought him a pair of jeans that had ready-made tears in them. When I realized, I was sure this would be a disaster, but for some reason, it was fine with him. He wears them quite regularly…….. figure that one out. I can not!

“Nice soft pants”:

For quite a while in middle school and some of high school,  DC was obsessed with fleece pants from Old Navy – elastic waist of course. The problem being he wanted to wear them year-round. It took quite a while to get him into jeans or any non-elastic waist pants. We compromised by  trading in his “nice soft pants” – many of them anyway, for nice soft pajama pants. He is now probably the only ‘kid’ in the world that is absolutely thrilled to get pajamas for Christmas. Wearing them at night seems to take away the sting of having to wear “real pants” during the day. Did I say “night”? Well I really meant as soon as he gets home and knows or hopes that he does not have to go anywhere else. This could be at noon on some days.

When he did finally make that transition from nice soft elastic waist pants to jeans and regular pants he refused to unbutton or unzip them. He could somehow pull on and take off all of his pants fully zipped and buttoned. I don’t know how he managed this but he did.

Zippers, hats and gloves:

It is always a battle to get him to zip up his coat (I am not a coat “zipper or buttoner” myself). He does not like to wear hats and gloves either. He works in a greenhouse so these are a must.  He will wear his Dr. Who hat – it has had long tassels that hang on either side. DC was insistent on tying these tassels like a bonnet. I explained to him many times that they are not made to be tied. Finally one day last week, I got a note home from his program that he pulled both tassels off of his hat. Why didn’t I think of that? He is now perfectly happy to wear his hat – at work – without the tassels. He still does not want to wear gloves. I have to insist. I do suspect that they come off as soon as his transportation leaves the driveway.

Tee-Shirts:

DC loves tee-shirts – not all tee-shirts though. I am still in the dark about why he absolutely hates some and loves others. I do know that they can not have pockets. Lately he has an aversion to white tee-shirts. I cannot get an explanation for this either. Grey was just added to his list of colors he will not wear. When I asked him why, I was told emphatically “White”! Apparently grey is the new white – it’s all the same to him.

The funny thing about all of this is that DC loves to dress up. He loves wearing a white dress shirt (with buttons) and a tie. He loves wearing a suit. He seems very comfortable all dressed up.

Shorts:

When DC was young, he loved wearing shorts. Switching from shorts to long pants in the fall was quite the battle. Now-a-days he would rather not wear them at all. Again, he works in a greenhouse and in the summer it is hot. He goes to camp, it is hot. He doesn’t care. I have often thought that DC does not feel heat and cold. He sleeps with a heavy comforter in the summertime. He will not have an air conditioner or a fan in his room. Fortunately the AC in my room will cool his room a bit so he doesn’t over- heat. In the winter he pushes the sleeves up his shirts, jackets and winter coats no matter what the temperature.

The latest clothing quirk; he has begun rolling up his short sleeves – just like the guys that carried their cigarettes in their Tee-Shirt sleeve back in the day. In addition to that, he likes to roll up his pants, just enough to make them “high-waters”. It looks very stylish with the white sweat socks. <sarcasm>

A few weeks ago, DC had a Valentine’s Dance to attend. It was scheduled to begin at 5PM. I knew I would not make it home from work in time to get him into the shower, get him to change his clothes and still get him there on time, so I asked Doug if he would come over to help him get ready and drive him to the dance. Knowing DC and Doug very well, I was not going to leave it to them to choose his wardrobe for the dance.  I laid out clothes for DC in the morning before I left for work…….

Best-laid plans…………

DC came walking in the door after the dance wearing the clothes I had laid out but with his pants rolled up, white sweat socks and his black dress shoes.

runway

“You may now leave the runway….”

 

 

(Here is another ‘Clothing Related’ post from Autism Mom that has been published since……   The Purge – give it a read)

January reruns – Scotch Tape, Salt and Some Good Old Fairy Dust

In keeping with my winter rerun theme – remember back in the day when TV shows went into reruns during December and January instead of being replaced by something new? – I am re-posting an older blog from 2013, because, really…nothing has changed…..

I am still hiding pens, hiding scotch tape and keeping salt and pepper shakers out of sight – which means the Dr. Who salt and pepper shakers I received for Christmas are displayed on the shelf….. empty….. sigh

who

From February 2013:

Everyone needs a little “fairy dust”

Everyone needs a little Fairy Dust

Harassing my co-workers for their paper towel rolls for a project this week, made me think about the reasons I don’t buy paper towels myself. This then led me to think about all of the other things I don’t buy, have to hide or make adjustments to, around the house.

Shampoo: This is no longer an issue, but at one time and for many years if I forgot to take the shampoo out of the shower, most of the bottle would be used to paint a masterpiece and the rest went down the drain…… every time.

Paper Towels: Paper Towels are for shredding and only for shredding. On the rare occasion that I do buy them, they have to be hidden on top of the refrigerator. Hiding the paper towels makes them not very convenient for me to use and forgettable, so there really isn’t any point  in buying them at all.

Paper: Every single piece of blank paper in the house has a Disney character’s name written on it. Teachers, Camp councilors and  anyone else I have to write a note to, receives that note on our exclusive custom stationary. After a few weeks of notes to camp, the Director finally asked “Do you guys do ‘A Character a day or something’?” No, unfortunately nothing that creative, I just can’t keep the paper out of the hands of my in-house stationary designer.

Construction Paper: Construction paper is also used specifically for character names, BUT according to the rule made up in his head,  these sheets can not and will not be saved. They MUST be cut up into small pieces with scissors and spread out all over the floor. He must also write on each sheet of  an entire package of paper before he begins the job of shredding/cutting. A few pieces just doesn’t do it. A package of construction paper will only last an hour or two after it has been opened.

Old Grainy picture of DC surrounded by shredded construction paper.

He has been a bit better with the construction paper lately. He still writes his character names. He still will not save them as he does with plain white paper, but now at least, he rips them up, one at a time and throws them away. –  (say it with me….) Progress!

Baby wipes (or hand wipes): Wipes are used for “Cinderella chores” ; washing the floor and door. This could actually be a good thing if he didn’t use  20 of them to wash the same spot on the same floor and the same spot on the same door. We don’t buy wipes anymore.

Scotch Tape: Scotch tape can be used on anything and for anything. For the most part, it is used to tape up pages in his books. Some books require an entire roll for just the smallest tear. Scotch tape can also be used to build a drum out of a cup or a bowl. He covers the top of the cup or bowl with tape….. a two roll minimum of tape, and this is his drum. Yes, creative, and yes he figured this out by himself but now I have to hide my tape in the cellar if I hope to find any when I need it.

His very own scotch tape is now an item on all of his Christmas/Birthday lists. One friend in particular has been very creative with her gifts of scotch tape. He just loves them!

Scotch Tape: For the boy who has everything!

Pens: No matter how many pens I hide for myself, I can not ever find a pen. He has all of them…… somewhere, I don’t know where and he is not telling. He will return the pens that don’t work –  those are always readily available.

Buttons: If there is a button there, it needs to be buttoned. Years ago I thought I was being sneaky by removing the top button on all of his shirts so he would not insist on buttoning everything right up to his neck. I discovered I was not as slick as I thought I was one day when DC brought me one of his shirts to have the button removed. He knows there should be a button there and knows I’m cutting it off, but for some reason this is alright with him. Leaving it on and not buttoning it, is not.

Other clothes: All tags must be removed from all clothing. If he should find the smallest rip, tear or string, he will proceed to shred that article of clothing. It may take him all day, but he will make sure it can never be worn again. Just recently I mistakenly bought him a pair of jeans that had ready-made tears in them. When I realized, I was sure this would be a disaster, but for some reason, it was fine with him. He wears them quite regularly…….. figure that one out. I can not!

Salt: We do not keep salt or sugar on the table. Salt is used as fairy dust. If it is not being sprinkled on his food, then there is no other use for salt, except to be used as fairy dust. Crumbs, the cereal dust at the bottom of the cereal box, crushed chips and a number of other items can also be used as fairy dust, but salt is the ultimate in fairy dust.

I’ve been “Fairy-Dusted” many times, so has the kitchen, the living room, restaurant tables and his uncle when, a few years back, DC got his hands on some cotton candy sugar at a picnic (Cotton Candy Sugar = Pink and Blue Fairy Dust; what could be better!)  Delightfully he took a very large handful and “dusted” his Uncle’s head yelling;

“Think of a wonderful thought” 

Who doesn't need a little Fairy Dust every once in a while?

His Uncle didn’t get it……..

But really…..who couldn’t use a little fairy dust every once in a while?

(He is better with salt these days, but I  will not keep it on the table, it is just too much for him to resist)

Knock Three Times

knock three times

DC and I attend many events, activities and parties. Many related to his autism or specifically geared to special needs children and adults, many are not. Although I do write about some of these events or trips, I certainly do not write about all of them as, in most cases, there is nothing significantly related to DC and his autism to write about. This event was not going to become the subject of one of my posts; it had nothing to do with Autism, there would be no princesses, no wizard, no costumes, no bookstore – just DC, my mother and I attending a fundraising event hosted by an old friend of mine.

After attending, I do feel the need to write about it, and write about it from the perspective of DC and his autism and how, at times people really do go out of their way to make DC comfortable.

An old friend of mine invited us to his annual fundraising event.  We could not make it last year, I can not remember why, but we were available to attend this year. We invited my mother to go along with us. Knowing full well that a sit-down-dinner at a table with probably 6 to 8 other people would be tough for him (and me), I tried, as I always do, to relate* the event to something of interest to him.

Tony Orlando, The Honorary Chairperson, would in attendance. Now, I am old enough to know who Tony Orlando is, but I didn’t know how to relate him to something in DC’s world. There have been many times where I am surprised by who DC does know. Usually I find out that they are “the voice” of a character  in one of his movies. I checked on-line to see if Tony Orlando might have been the “voice of” anyone DC might relate to. He was not. But then I realized that whenever we hear “Knock three times” on the radio, I make DC sing along with me. We’ve done it enough times that he does now recognize the song. It is also one of the few songs that DC does not say, “Mom, please STOP singing!”

First hurdle, relating this event to something in his world – check!

The event was being held in the midst of our Halloween party season. We had already attended one party and we had a few more on the schedule in the next few days. The event’s description indicated that it would be a 40’s style gala. I did not know what that really meant but I went out and purchased a 40’s style men’s hat to go with DC’s suit.

Second hurdle, turning the event into a “costume party” – check!

My greatest concern was the seating arrangements. As I talked about in an earlier post, there are not many things that we avoid because of DC’s autism, but we do try to avoid situations where we will be seated at a crowded table with strangers.  There are times when it can not be avoided, and we get through it, but if I can avoid it, I will.

I am usually not a big fan of eating in the dining room with DC. The tables are crowded with strangers. I get anxious because DC, although pretty well-behaved in restaurants, can get a little bit loud and chewing with his mouth closed does not come naturally to him, he has to be reminded continuously. When he does remember on his own, he feels the need to point it out to me throughout the entire dinner. He likes to bring a book with him whenever we go out to eat, but at these crowded tables, it is not always possible, there just isn’t enough room.

I was never of the mind that other people should be made to just accept DC’s behavior. Yes, if I am trying to manage the situation I can live without the stares and comments – but letting him do whatever he wants in the name of awareness, is not something I ever subscribed to. I do not believe that every behavior can or should be blamed on his autism – it is never used as an excuse.

 

I was told that I had to e-mail someone for reservations before purchasing tickets. I am not one that ever asks for special treatment or accommodations for DC, but since I had to send an e-mail, I decided I would just mention that DC tends to get a little bit anxious in crowds and if they happened to have a table that was not full; would it be possible to be seated there? I didn’t want them to go out of their way or change anything around, I just thought that if there was already such a table available, I would appreciate it if we could be seated there. It wasn’t a deal-breaker, we were going either way, but since I had someone’s ear I thought it could not hurt to ask.

DC has issues with many types of clothing, more-so now than when he was younger, but there is nothing better, in DC’s eyes, than wearing a suit. I suspect the fact that people tell him how handsome he looks is the number one reason – if you neglect to tell him just how handsome he looks, believe me he will bring it to your attention. Add the hat “costume” to his already handsome apparel and he was over the moon.

The very first thing DC noticed upon arrival was the sign for the “Grand Ballroom”. I had not thought of this aspect when looking for things relatable for DC. Not only was he going to see the ‘voice of’ “Knock Three Times”, while looking handsome in costume, but we were going to the “Ball”! How did I miss that one?

We were in the lobby with quite a few others who had arrived a few minutes early. We were told that we had to wait a few minutes as the staff was still in the process of setting up. DC was having the normal anxiety he has upon arriving anywhere. I always know it is coming, he just needs a little time to shake it off. The woman at the door noticed he was having a difficult time, and shuffled us into the ballroom. We were away from the crowd and he didn’t have to ‘wait”. He would have been alright waiting with everyone else, but it would have taken him longer to shake his ‘arrival anxiety’, so I was very appreciative that she let us in.

We found our table. It was the very last table all the way in the corner. It was perfect.  DC, who generally is not aware of anything around him in terms of pushing his chair out, getting up from the table without looking to see if anyone is coming or putting his coat on, arms flying outward to accidentally hit anyone that might be in range, had room behind him so he would not bump  into anyone else’s’ chair or knock anyone over when he got up from the table. There was no one behind us to bother if he felt the need to get up and dance. We were the only people in the ballroom other than the staff and a few people I assume were with the organization, for quite some time. Not long after, Tony Orlando came down the stairs. I do not like to bother people. DC has had his picture taken with many people over the years but it was almost always as a photo op. I just do not feel right asking people that are not there for that reason, to take a picture. My mother, had other ideas. She reached into her box of ammunition and pulled out the ‘Mom Guilt’….. “Oh you have to!” , “He won’t mind, he’s used to it” (that went on for awhile),  she stared at me for awhile and then resorted to the sideways glance, “Now, Vickie” in a tone I hadn’t heard in years, I finally gave in, only under the condition that SHE had to do the asking.

She went over and asked him and of course he said yes. I don’t know what else she said to him, but he was happy to do it.

First, he told DC that he looked like a movie star. You know that won DC over completely. I told him that his friend BB and Mrs. H will be so jealous. (That is usually DC’s line when we go somewhere that he is excited to be, but I decided to use it just as an added incentive to help move him out of his anxiety).  Mr. Orlando was very good to DC. They had a little chat and he told DC that they would be “friends forever”, and DC certainly believes they will.

I am officially adding Tony Orlando to the list of people I will always hold in high regard  for not only taking the photo with him, but taking the time to actually try to have a conversation with him and making him feel special.

 

When they began letting all of the other attendees into the ballroom we realized that we were the only people that would be sitting at our table. One of the women that I had e-mailed before we purchased the tickets stopped by to be sure we didn’t feel as if we were being isolated. It was a perfect table and we did not feel isolated at all. We didn’t expect them to go that much out of their way to give us our own table, but I was so glad they did. DC had room for his ever-present book, he was able to get up and dance behind the table when he wanted to. There was a window right there that helped to keep him occupied; he loves to stand and just look out the window. When it got dark outside, the window then served as his own personal mirror.  There is no one that loves looking at himself in a mirror or any reflective surface more than DC does, especially that night , while wearing his new hat.

Third hurdle – Not siting at a crowded table – check!

He enjoyed watching the ballroom dancers they had performing. At one point I did take him out closer to the dance floor where he could watch them (and follow along, pretty well, I might add) from the sidelines. He sang along with “Knock Three Times” and they even had pizza bites as one of the appetizers! What could be better!

Forth hurdle – DC’s very limited food list- check!

He had a wonderful (oops) ‘terrific’** time. Fortunately the ‘drop the chocolate, frosted, cupcake strategically down the opening of his jacket’ incident occurred toward the end of the evening; the smeared chocolate all over his shirt, tie and the inside of his jacket did not ruin the entire evening.

I did contact my friend, Joe the following day to thank him and to let him know how much his people went out of their way to make DC comfortable. I appreciated everything they had done.

They have also been added to my list.

 

*(That “Everything is Related” post I keep threatening to write IS now in progress and will be posted at a later date)

** “terrific” DC’s latest word, replacing “wonderful”.

Everyone needs a little “fairy dust”

Everyone needs a little Fairy Dust

Everyone needs a little Fairy Dust

Harassing my co-workers for their paper towel rolls for a project this week, made me think about the reasons I don’t buy paper towels myself. This then led me to think about all of the other things I don’t buy, have to hide or make adjustments to, around the house.

Shampoo: This is no longer an issue, but at one time and for many years if I forgot to take the shampoo out of the shower, most of the bottle would be used to paint a masterpiece and the rest went down the drain…… every time.

Paper Towels: Paper Towels are for shredding and only for shredding. On the rare occasion that I do buy them, they have to be hidden on top of the refrigerator. Hiding the paper towels makes them not very convenient for me to use and forgettable, so there really isn’t any point  in buying them at all.

Paper: Every single piece of blank paper in the house has a Disney character’s name written on it. Teachers, Camp councilors and  anyone else I have to write a note to, receives that note on our exclusive custom stationary. After a few weeks of notes to camp, the Director finally asked “Do you guys do ‘A Character a day or something’?” No, unfortunately nothing that creative, I just can’t keep the paper out of the hands of my in-house stationary designer.

Construction Paper: Construction paper is also used specifically for character names, BUT according to the rule made up in his head,  these sheets can not and will not be saved. They MUST be cut up into small pieces with scissors and spread out all over the floor. He must also write on each sheet of  an entire package of paper before he begins the job of shredding/cutting. A few pieces just doesn’t do it. A package of construction paper will only last an hour or two after it has been opened.

Old Grainy picture of DC surrounded by shredded construction paper.

Old Grainy picture of DC surrounded by shredded construction paper.

He has been a bit better with the construction paper lately. He still writes his character names. He still will not save them as he does with plain white paper, but now at least, he rips them up, one at a time and throws them away. –  (say it with me….) Progress!

Baby wipes (or hand wipes): Wipes are used for “Cinderella chores” ; washing the floor and door. This could actually be a good thing if he didn’t use  20 of them to wash the same spot on the same floor and the same spot on the same door. We don’t buy wipes anymore.

Scotch Tape: Scotch tape can be used on anything and for anything. For the most part, it is used to tape up pages in his books. Some books require an entire roll for just the smallest tear. Scotch tape can also be used to build a drum out of a cup or a bowl. He covers the top of the cup or bowl with tape….. a two roll minimum of tape, and this is his drum. Yes, creative, and yes he figured this out by himself but now I have to hide my tape in the cellar if I hope to find any when I need it.

His very own scotch tape is now an item on all of his Christmas/Birthday lists. One friend in particular has been very creative with her gifts of scotch tape. He just loves them!

Scotch Tape: For the boy who has everything!

Scotch Tape: For the boy who has everything!

Pens: No matter how many pens I hide for myself, I can not ever find a pen. He has all of them…… somewhere, I don’t know where and he is not telling. He will return the pens that don’t work –  those are always readily available.

Buttons: If there is a button there, it needs to be buttoned. Years ago I thought I was being sneaky by removing the top button on all of his shirts so he would not insist on buttoning everything right up to his neck. I discovered I was not as slick as I thought I was one day when DC brought me one of his shirts to have the button removed. He knows there should be a button there and knows I’m cutting it off, but for some reason this is alright with him. Leaving it on and not buttoning it, is not.

Other clothes: All tags must be removed from all clothing. If he should find the smallest rip, tear or string, he will proceed to shred that article of clothing. It may take him all day, but he will make sure it can never be worn again. Just recently I mistakenly bought him a pair of jeans that had ready-made tears in them. When I realized, I was sure this would be a disaster, but for some reason, it was fine with him. He wears them quite regularly…….. figure that one out. I can not!

Salt: We do not keep salt or sugar on the table. Both are used as fairy dust.  There is no other use for salt, except to be used as fairy dust. Crumbs, the cereal dust at the bottom of the cereal box, crushed chips and a number of other items can also be used as fairy dust, but salt is the ultimate in fairy dust.

I’ve been “Fairy-Dusted” many times, so has the kitchen, the living room, restaurant tables and his uncle when, a few years back, DC got his hands on some cotton candy sugar at a picnic (Cotton Candy Sugar = Pink and Blue Fairy Dust; what could be better!)  Delightfully he took a very large handful and “dusted” his Uncle’s head yelling;

“Think of a wonderful thought” 

Who doesn't need a little Fairy Dust every once in a while?

Who doesn’t need a little Fairy Dust every once in a while?

His Uncle didn’t get it……..

But really…..who couldn’t use a little fairy dust every once in a while?

(He is better with salt these days, but I  will not keep it on the table, it is just too much for him to resist)