“I am so proud of ME!!!”

proud

I promise that you all will not have to read about every single test DC has to take but this one was a huge accomplishment for him – HUGE!

A year ago…. even a couple of months ago, I would never have attempted an MRI with out the benefit of sedation (his, but these days it might be beneficial for me too ūüôā ). Never! It just¬†would not even have been a consideration.

He has been through so many appointments and tests lately that I was really hoping that he was just getting used to it and maybe, possibly he would be able to cooperate. I mean he had blood drawn Рthat was major. Even the EEG was quite the accomplishment for him. Knowing now just how long all of these tests take to schedule to begin with, I did not want to wait the extra week or two or three for an appointment to sedate.

I talked to him about it the entire week before the test. I showed him pictures, I showed him videos. I explained that he had to do nothing else but stay still. There was nothing that was going to hurt or pinch.¬†They were going to take pictures of his head while he was inside the machine. I have only had one MRI myself, for my arm/shoulder. It wasn’t fun but it only took about 20 minutes, so I was hoping that after all he had already been through he would be able to manage it.

We arrived at the hospital in the morning. Grandma and DC read a book while I filled out pages of paperwork. He did not seem nervous at all.

reading in the waiting room

He started getting anxious as soon as the nurse came to say¬†that they would be calling him¬†in shortly. Lisa, our “guide” for the test, came to get us. We went into another room to answer more questions. DC was now moving into¬†“close to extreme¬†anxiety mode” and I am sure that Lisa was now concerned that he¬†was not going to¬†be able to do this. This is when she told me that there would be an IV involved………

Lovely Рnow I am a big fat liar. No one told me about this. I never had any sort of IV when I had my MRI. Maybe I was supposed to know this but seriously, up until a few months ago neither DC or I have never really ever had to have any kind of tests like this so I really had no idea. Of course I have had blood work and the one MRI and maybe an x-ray or two , but other than that there has been nothing for either of us.

Just so DC¬†would not think I¬†had lied to him and because whatever the consequences, I always tell him the truth and what is going to happen¬†– I explained that he would have to have an IV in his arm, not like¬†the needle¬†they used when¬†they took blood but just a little poke like when he was in the ambulance. I told him that¬†I was sorry I didn’t tell him before but I didn’t know. No one told me. He seemed all right with that explanation but I could see he was getting even more nervous. She told me that they would take pictures for 30 minutes, bring him out to give him the IV for the last 10 minutes of the MRI.

40 MINUTES!!!! Now I was absolutely¬†sure we were done. I was positive this was not going to work. She told me the worse case scenario¬†if he tried and just could not¬†stay still that long would be “conscious sedation”, but…. we would have to make a new appointment and¬†come back another day.

Thankfully, he did not have to change out of his clothes because that would just be something else for him to obsess about. He did have to¬†remove his glasses – not happy. I was able to go into the room with him and hold his hand. It was torture standing there watching him. He had a difficult time staying still, but he was still enough through enough of¬†the test¬†that they were able to get¬†what they needed. At one point I did make them stop and take him out. I could see he was getting¬†more¬†and more agitated.¬†I didn’t want him¬†to get to the point where he would not go back in. They attached a mirror to the helmet/bracket that was holding his head in place so that he could see me. That seemed to help a great deal. He was able to go back in and finish the first 30 minutes.

They brought him out for the IV. This was a bit difficult. He of course got very anxious and was struggling. I laid across his free arm and the two techs held his other arm. They managed to get the IV in and just when I thought we were free and clear, they determined that it wasn’t working. They had to do it again, this time in his hand. I think the tech was more upset than I was about having to stick him again.

DC and I sang a few rounds of “They Call Me Sir DC the Brave”¬† (luckily I had learned the words from the last test)¬†all the while ¬†thinking that this was definitely the end of the road. He was not going to stand for this. They managed to get the IV in before he even noticed and he was good to go. He did give us a few fake “Ouch” Ouches when he realized it was already in – just for good measure.

Amazingly enough he finished the last 10 minutes and it was over. He was so happy and proud of himself.

After he got his glasses back “I can see, I can see!” – our first order of business was to take this brave guy for wings – correction…. our first order of business was to¬†cut¬†off the¬† hospital wrist band. We can not wear that a second longer than necessary.

On our way to the restaurant I gave him the phone so he could call Doug. In his loudest – highest pitched voice, he screamed into the phone “I did it, I did it! I am so proud of me!!!!”¬†

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He continued to yell with excitement during lunch and all of the way home where he fell asleep¬†immediately after telling me “I am not tired!”

sleep

A few days later he received a Certificate of Bravery in the mail from his aunt. She was proud of him too and he was thrilled. There is nothing DC loves more than to have everyone to tell him over and over again just how proud they are of him!

bravery

But seriously,¬†I could not be prouder of him.¬†This guy never ceases to amaze me…….

 

 

 

 

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10 thoughts on ““I am so proud of ME!!!”

  1. I’ve never had an MRI, but had a CT scan, I’m not claustrophobic, but those small places can freak me out a tad, in addition to keeping still ( spastic ). I can empathise with DC.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: More short stories | Taking it a Step at a Time - Autism

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